A CALL TO MEN 2015 National Conference (Sept. 10 and 11)

Sponsored in part by the Carolina Panthers and the NFL, A CALL TO MEN will be holding its annual national conference in Charlotte this year.  The event, titled “Sports Culture:  Advancing its Role in Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Prevention,” will take place on Thursday, Sept. 10 and Friday, Sept. 11 at the Sheraton Charlotte Airport Hotel (3315 Scott Futrell Drive) in Charlotte.

Topics covered at the conference will include coaching healthy respectful manhood, trafficking and major sporting events, addressing violence against women in the entertainment/music industry, the role of faith communities in domestic violence prevention, and many more.  Presenters at the two-day event will include Jennifer Siebel Newsom, founder of the Representation Project; Rachel Lloyd, founder/CEO of Girls Educational and Mentoring Services; Lynn Rosenthal, former White House advisor on violence against women; and Mildred Muhammad, author and domestic abuse survivor.

To register for this event, please visit the EventBrite page at actm2015nationalconference.eventbrite.com.  For any additional questions, please contact Danielle Erwin at Danielle@acalltomen.org.

A CALL TO MEN is a leading national violence prevention organization providing training and education for men, boys and communities. The organization’s aim is to shift social norms that negatively impact our culture and promote a more healthy and respectful definition of manhood.

Wake County Childhood Injury/Violence Prevention Networking Event (June 18)

Join us for the 2nd Annual Wake County Childhood Injury and Violence Prevention Networking Event!  It will take place on Thursday, June 18, from 8:30 am to 12:00 pm at the Local Government Federal Credit Union Conference Center (323 W. Jones St.) in downtown Raleigh.

The event is the official launch of the Skills & Knowledge for Injury Prevention Partners (SKIPP) – supported by the John Rex Endowment.  The SKIPP Project will provide networking and training opportunities to injury and violence prevention practitioners who serve children and youth in Wake County.

Keynote speaker Alan Dellapenna, Jr., is the Injury and Violence Prevention Branch Head of the NC Division of Public Health.  He will share insights on how the field of injury and violence prevention has grown over the years, as well as discussing statewide efforts on the issue.  Break-out sessions during the event will also allow attendees to network and share with others about applying evidence-informed strategies to prevent child and youth injury.

This event is free, but space is limited.  Anyone interested in attending should register by June 11 at the following link:  https://unc.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ezyrBIj0v5GC1UN.  For more information, please contact Robert LeTourneau at robert_letourneau@unc.edu.

NC Human Trafficking Commission Meeting (May 21)

The NC Human Trafficking Commission will hold a meeting on Thursday, May 21, from 10 AM to 1 PM.  This meeting is open to the public, and it will be held at the Governor’s Crime Commission, 1201 Front Street, in downtown Raleigh.

Here is a copy of the Public Notice of Meeting on 5.21.15 from the NC Department of Justice.  For more information about the meeting, please contact Assistant Attorney General Narcisa Woods at (919) 716-6938.

Two free webcasts: “How are Our Kids Doing?” (May 12)

On Tuesday, May 12, there will be two free webcasts about children and education.

Webcast #1 will be the release of the 2015 Building a Grad Nation report at 9 AM.  A major goal is for the United States to graduate 90 percent of our high school students by 2020.  The rate has steadily increased, from 79 percent in 2011, to 80 percent in 2012, to 81.4 percent in 2013.  Progress, though, is uneven across communities, states, and social groups.  Researchers behind this report will present key findings and discuss what it will take to reach the 2020 goal of 90 percent graduation.  Register for the free webcast at this link!

Webcast #2 will be a discussion of “The American Dream and Our Kids,” beginning at 1 PM.  Join America’s Promise Alliance founding chair Gen. Colin L. Powell and Harvard University professor and author Dr. Robert Putnam as they discuss opportunity gaps along the pathway to the American Dream and what can be done to fix them.  Register for the free webcast at this link!

The webcasts are free, but space is limited, so please register at the supplied links.  On May 12, be sure to join the conversation and share your thoughts on social media with the hashtag #GradNation.

Nest Foundation creates curriculum to accompany “Playground” documentary

The Nest Foundation recently made a film called “Playground,” a documentary that explores the devastating impact of child sex trafficking in the United States.  The film has been shown in communities across the country and even around the world, and Nest has found that prevention education is our most powerful investment in the effort to stop child sexual exploitation and trafficking.

At every screening, a common question was asked by members of the audience:  “How do we get this film into high schools?”  The average age of a child trafficked for sex is 13, and if children are not aware of the signs of potential perpetrators, they may end up becoming victims.

In December 2014, Nest launched a new curriculum about preventing sexual exploitation.  This high school curriculum focuses on 4 crucial topics:  breaking down sexual exploitation and trafficking; deconstructing media and advertising that send the wrong messages about sexuality; encouraging students to be smart about what they share on social media; and encouraging youth action and citizenship so that students can be heard.

The curriculum was piloted in Portland, OR, and data from Nest’s 2014 Annual Report revealed intriguing data:  87 percent of students were able to recognize trafficking as a form of modern-day slavery; 88 percent of students recognized the role pop culture plays in sustaining the sex industry; and 95 percent of students felt equipped to take action within their communities to prevent exploitation and trafficking.

The data shows the importance of education in the prevention of human trafficking and modern-day slavery, and “Playground” is a documentary that gives strong support in teaching the public about how to recognize it and how to ultimately prevent it.  The Nest Foundation is currently looking at other cities across the country for implementation of its new curriculum, such as Los Angeles, San Francisco, Austin, Dallas, and New York.  With the curriculum, Nest hopes to arm a generation of our youth to stay safe and smart in their own environments!  You can join the conversation on their Facebook and Twitter pages, and you can find out more about the documentary’s impact summary at nestfoundation.org.

JLR Conference (May 2)

The Junior League of Raleigh is hosting its second annual Empowering Women’s Conference.  The conference will be on Saturday, May 2, from 8 AM to 2:30 PM at the Center for Community Leadership (711 Hillsborough St) in Raleigh.

The keynote speaker of the event will be Molly Barker, founder of Girls on the Run.  Established in Charlotte in 1996, this non-profit organization provides young girls with the necessary skills to embrace their individual strengths and successfully navigate life experiences.  Girls on the Run is now in over 200 cities across North America, thanks to the help of over 120,000 volunteers!

The JLR conference on May 2 is a free event, and complimentary breakfast and lunch are included.  Anyone interested in attending may register at www.jlraleigh.org.

SEAHEC Workshop on Human Trafficking (April 20)

The South East Area Health Education Center (SEAHEC) in Wilmington is offering a one-day workshop on human trafficking.  This workshop will address its prevalence, characteristics of victims, and resources available for referral and treatment.

The target audience of this workshop is psychologists, nurses, counselors, social workers, and any other professional within the field of health.  Upon completion of the workshop, attendees should be able to identify the characteristics of a human trafficking victim, identify state laws pertaining to victims and perpetrators, recognize health care needs of victims, and list community resources available to victims and professionals.

The workshop will take place on Monday, April 20, from 8:30 AM to 3:15 PM at SEAHEC (2511 Delaney Avenue) in Wilmington.  This course offers professional health care credits, such as 5 contact hours, 5 nursing contact hours, the Category A NC Psychology Credit, and 5 hours of the National Board for Certified Counselors Credit.

An event flyer and registration form are supplied here in this PDF file.  Interested participants may also register online at SEAHEC’s event page.  For more event information, please contact Amanda Miller at (910) 667-9348 or at Amanda.miller@seahec.net.